Be More Generous at Work, It’ll Feel Good

Being generous simply means giving freely of yourself – your knowledge, your expertise, your time, or your possessions – without expecting anything in return.  It can range from helping a disabled person with her groceries to serving on the board of a nonprofit organization.  It’s good for you – numerous research studies have shown that generous people are healthier and happier and have higher levels of life satisfaction.

Generosity doesn’t come naturally to everyone, but you can incorporate it into your life by making a commitment to perform one selfless act every day.  Doing something like a thirty minute informational interview about your field may seem small to you, but it can mean a great deal to a person who looks up to you, or is going through a difficult period.  Start very small, and increase your commitment as you get more comfortable.

Make it Automatic

You can also get involved in an activity that requires you to exercise your generosity on an ongoing basis.  Mentoring a colleague – either younger or older – is a terrific way to share the fruits of a successful career, and helping to better society through volunteer work with a community-based organization will allow you to give back while building lasting ties and a repertoire of new skills.  And because giving is contagious, you’ll find your own sense of generosity increasing if you hang out with similarly-minded people.

Work on Your Perspective

Some people find their efforts at generosity hindered by the fear that there aren’t enough resources to go around.  “But my group is downsizing.  How can I take the time to help others when my own livelihood is on the line?” you might ask.  Remember that no matter how precarious your situation is, there are a lot of people out there who have it much worse.  Act according to the laws of karma and assume that what you put into the world will eventually come back.

Alexandra Levit

Alexandra Levit’s goal is to help people find meaningful jobs - quickly and simply - and to succeed beyond measure once they get there. Follow her @alevit.

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  • http://twitter.com/SarahNagel Sarah Nagel

    I loved your book “They Don’t Teach Corporate in College” and always wanted to send you a thank-you note to let you know. It was so helpful (and still is – I refer to it on hard days)! You offer a really smart, balanced perspective that is so relevant – especially for young people. Much appreciated :)

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  • Anonymous

    Thanks so much for your comment, Sarah, you made my day!  If you want to cut and paste the comment as a review on Corporate in College’s Amazon page, that would be awesome.  In the meantime, thanks for reading our blog and have a terrific holiday weekend!

    [Reply]