Being Happy at Work Takes Work

You might not believe me when I tell you this, but I have one wish for my children, and it’s not that they are intelligent or successful.  I want them to be happy.  That’s it.

If happiness is a challenge for you, you might understand where I’m coming from.  And thanks to experts like New York-based writer Gretchen Rubin, happiness has become a twenty-first century mandate.  Gretchen was on a city bus in the rain when she asked herself what it would take to make her happy.  She didn’t have an immediate answer, leading to a year of research and a book, The Happiness Project, that includes insights on well-being from history, philosophy, scientific studies, and real-life experiences.

Gretchen says that happiness is something everyone should think about, even if you’re fortunate to have the staples of a good life: health, career, and relationships.

Look Inside Yourself

The area of life that people say makes them most miserable is work, which is really too bad. When it comes to finding a role that makes you happier, start with a roster of things you genuinely like to do. Note that your list should not include things you feel you ought to like.  This requires looking inside yourself, because everyone has different inclinations and varying definitions of fun.

And you don’t necessarily have to overhaul your career completely. Being happier at work can be as simple as starting your day off right by making your bed or finding a friend to talk to over your lunch hour. And those who are self-sacrificing will be relieved to hear that doing things to make others happy is apparently one of the easiest ways to be happy yourself.

Choose Your Attitude

If you’re having a rough time job wise, being happy might be easier said than done.  Remember that have the ability to choose your response to your environment and that you can change your attitude for the better by choosing to focus on particular thoughts.  To that end, it helps to focus on the present moment.  Instead of ruminating about the past or the future, recognize the positive aspects of life in the here and now.  Whether it’s a line of glowing feedback from your boss or a smile from your child, you will inevitably experience something that has the power to turn your day around.

If you’re considering or actively making a career change, attending a conference (insert conference post link) in your target field can be a smart strategy to move things forward.  Travel and participation can be time consuming and expensive, however, so you want to be certain that each conference represents a sound investment in your future career.

Alexandra Levit

Alexandra Levit’s goal is to help people find meaningful jobs - quickly and simply - and to succeed beyond measure once they get there. Follow her @alevit.

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  • http://twitter.com/seven2521 Equality 7-2521

    “And those who are self-sacrificing will be relieved to hear that doing things to make others happy is apparently one of the easiest ways to be happy yourself.”

    This is the biggest contradiction and worse career advice I’ve ever heard.

    First of all, if you (somehow) actually enjoy making others happy while you suffer, then it’s not really a sacrifice for you is it? I believe they call that masochism.

    Second, if work is just a burden, boy are you missing what life is about! If you can have a sense of passion and energy in your life, you have to have a sense of purpose in your work.

    Everybody wants to make the world a better place to live. You wouldn’t be reading this post if you didn’t want to make the world a better place to live. But you need to make the world a better place to live doing something you want to do FOR YOU. You have the right to your own life, and even if you made the world a better place to live but you didn’t enjoy doing it, you would have wasted the most precious thing you have which is your own life.

    By the way, I didn’t say all that, this guy did:
    http://youtu.be/twolXLHBmgQ

    [Reply]

    Anonymous Reply:

    @Equality: I agree with you in part.  You cannot live your life SOLELY to make other people happy.  Well, you could, but that wouldn’t be productive.  Like everything, this advice must be taken in moderation.  It’s a matter of adequately balancing what you do for yourself with what you do for others.

    [Reply]

  • http://hrtalk.net/degree-in-human-resources-is-that-really-matter Degree in Human Resources

    Still the successful person in the world is the one who always live in happiness. Forget about how much money do you have, or how many power do you have. If you don’t feel happy they those all useless. 

    [Reply]

    Anonymous Reply:

    @Degree, you are absolutely right.  You know what they say about lottery winners.  All of that money doesn’t make them one bit happier.

    [Reply]

    HR Talk Reply:

    Indeed, like what last time people says, easy money easy go. If you earn money that “fall from the sky”, for sure you endup spend it like water that keep flowing until it run off.

    [Reply]

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