Workplace Success – What You Need to Know this Week

Workplace Success – What You Need to Know this Week

Here are three stories people are talking about this week.

1. How about a pre-cation before you start a new job?

Ever wished you could have some serious time off between jobs but felt like you couldn’t take it because the new company wanted you to start quickly? Then you’ll love “pre-cations,” a new perk from Silicon Valley, where start-ups are increasingly pushing new hires to take time off – on the company’s dime – before starting work. Some go so far as to give new hires not just paid time off before their first day, but travel vouchers too. “We want people to bring their best every day, and we want them here for the long haul,” Jeff Diana, Atlassian’s chief people officer told Slate. “Changing jobs is an important shift, and we want to give people time to recharge, spend some time with family. Because once you start a new job, you kind of jump all in.”

2. Could your choice of mate make or break your career?

The most successful people have particularly conscientious mates, finds new research that will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science. Researchers found that people who scored highest on three measures of career success –salary increases, promotions, and job satisfaction – all have mates with a personality type known as “conscientious,” meaning that they’re especially reliable, detail-oriented, and organized. After all, “it’s a lot easier to concentrate on your next brilliant idea at work if someone else can be counted on to make sure the dog has all his shots, the car gets inspected on time, and the kids are fed,” notes Fortune. Moreover, suggests the researcher, personality traits can rub off; over time, people may emulate the behaviors of their conscientious partners.

3. When a manager is a jerk, does intent matter?

When a manager is a jerk to staff members, does intent matter? A researcher at San Francisco State University set out to learn whether workers felt differently about abusive behavior from a boss when they believed it was intended to motivate them – to light a fire under them, for instance, or to get a team to up its game. Psychologist Kevin Eschleman found that this type of “motivational abuse” is just as counterproductive as abuse that’s meant solely to humiliate or demean. His study concluded that employees who are verbally abused – regardless of motivation – are more likely to slack off or act out at work. That’s one more reason that companies should care about how their managers are treating employees.

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